A hymn to god the father by john donne

Every person has lust. He has fear in his mind that he will disappear after his death.

john donne context

He is hopeful that Christ and God would be merciful and he will definitely be successful in eternal life. John Donne has not used any conceit in this poem.

a hymn to god the father theme

He fears total annihilation after death of the physical body. Below are a few words of analysis. He doesn't want to get stuck in Limbo—the place between heaven and hell—and he considers this fear to be another one of his sins: the sin of doubt.

Death be not proud

Thus, he has no other solution except to ask forgiveness. The speaker knows that the only help that will be of any true assistance is God. He doesn't want to get stuck in Limbo—the place between heaven and hell—and he considers this fear to be another one of his sins: the sin of doubt. No one is perfect. Instead of using his energy to seduce virgins, he is now seeking soul-awareness and a clean, dutiful life through prayer and meditation on the Divine. He believes that he has not achieved spiritual powers; the powers, which can bring him closer to God. John Donne knows that he is not part of very first sin but he also knows that he is not perfect; therefore, he focuses on forgiveness and mercy of the God. No one can control himself. In the second stanza, the speaker echoes his earlier questions, but this time he's concerned with the sins he's caused others to participate in, not to mention the sins which he was able to briefly avoid for a while before giving in and enjoying.

He has sown and now he must reap what he has sown. The poet wants to be superior. In the second stanza, the speaker echoes his earlier questions, but this time he's concerned with the sins he's caused others to participate in, not to mention the sins which he was able to briefly avoid for a while before giving in and enjoying.

What he wants is mercy and that too at the time of his last breath. Although he understands that he is primarily an eternal soul and immortal, he confides to his Maker that he also has doubts.

While the speaker has found it possible to control his lust for a short time, he had engaged in his sin many times longer, thus making the ridding of it very difficult.

The canonization

Readers can witness the theme of repentance and regret in the very first stanza of the poem. It seems that sin multiplies like rabbits. What he wants is mercy and that too at the time of his last breath. Although he understands that he is primarily an eternal soul and immortal, he confides to his Maker that he also has doubts. The speaker acknowledges that this sin isn't his the speaker's fault, and that it happened before he was even born. Will you forgive me when I have led others to sin, and even introduced them to the world of sin, acting like a door to welcome them in? He knows that he has to repair his life in order to reap only good in future. But in the final analysis, it is not the object of lust that is the culprit; it is the manner in which the one suffering the lust addresses his issue. Furthermore, Donne is talking generally. It is obvious that the rimes refer to the poet and the object of his lust. Instead of using his energy to seduce virgins, he is now seeking soul-awareness and a clean, dutiful life through prayer and meditation on the Divine. Will you forgive me for the sin which, barring a couple of years of abstinence, I practised for twenty whole years? Donne's "A Hymn to God the Father" is displayed in three stanzas, six lines in each stanza; however, the whole rime scheme consists of only two rimes. The theme of the poem is of repentance and forgiveness. The speaker decides that, as long as God swears that Jesus will still stand as a buffer between man's sins and God, he'll stop being afraid.

Stanza-II Analysis: Man does not only commit sins but also encourages other peoples to do the same.

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John Donne's "A Hymn to God the Father"